Spring Growth

Although this spring has been somewhat tumultuous weather-wise, the soil is clearly getting warmer and spring is definitely taking a hold in the garden. S.and I are loving having space to get outside and plant things, and of course T. is enjoying having space to run around. He loves looking for bugs, riding his motorbike, digging in the dirt and helping us with whatever we are doing. It’s just such a joy to have this space together. In light of having a new camera, I thought I’d share some of the latest pictures from around the garden.

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Mum and I decided one day in the middle of gardening to create a step of steps in the middle of the rock wall. We used rocks from around the garden to build it, and the packed dirt in around it. It’s still a bit unsteady though, so the next step is either to plant into the cracks, in the hope that the roots will stabilise it, or to use concrete to fix the rocks in place.

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S.’s vege garden up the back of the section (which she and her brother built) is growing well.

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My herb garden out the front is a bit of mixed success – half the plants are growing like crazy, the other half haven’t really taken off at all. My borage though is doing very well, but not yet attracting any bees as far as I can tell. Maybe its still too windy for them. In the last couple of weeks it’s just shot away, not really sure what to do with it all to be honest!

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My calendulas are probably the biggest garden success at the moment. I’ve been harvesting them almost weekly and then drying the petals to turn into infused oil, tincture, and balm in a couple of weeks, when I have a bit more time.

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T. often comes to help me harvest the calendulas and last time we were out in the garden it had been raining recently. He was totally fascinated by the way the still furled flowers were holding onto their water. So gorgeous to watch his fascination with nature grow.

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I am really loving the process of growing a garden (something I had never previously been interested in). I love how much more I notice small details and the way things are changing as the seasons progress.

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Okay, this is really just a gratuitous I have a new camera and doesn’t it take pretty photos shot, but I am looking forward to being able to eat the peaches from this tree one day.

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Probably the most major project that’s gone on recently is to get a front fence (and a back one) put in. Recently S. and I got around to planting up in front of it as it had just been grass. It’s all barked now and we are so stoked with how it has turned out.

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Okay, totally just another playing with my camera shot.

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We have had this apple tree for a couple of years in a pot and have spent much of that time wondering whether it was still alive, but it has absolutely just sprung to live now that it’s got its roots in the earth. This is the first time we’ve seen buds, and they are just so lovely.

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Our house has several big pinetrees out the front and they are completely laden with pinecones at the moment.

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This is the wild and prolific (in part) herb garden.

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My chamomile is also growing like wild fire. I’m going to need to do something with it soon.

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So is the coriander. I’ve been giving bags of it away to friends and family, but there’s still so much. I might try freezing it soon.

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There are so many wonderful little things to discover in the garden, and I just love seeing T. discover them.

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The lemon tree we were giving by S.’s siblings as a wedding present 5 years ago is loving it’s new home too. It’s also celebrating the spring weather with new buds and flowers.

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B.

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One thought on “Spring Growth

  1. Looking lush. Freezing coriander works well. If you have the space cut it and put in freezer on a flat tray then transfer to a ziplock bag once frozen. That way it doesn’t all turn into a clump. However if you don’t have time just chuck it in a bag and chop it when you need it. Means it’s a bit more slushy/squished up when you use it, but that works okay for some dishes πŸ™‚

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